Hydrogen Sulphide Gas in Heart Diseases Therapy

Hydrogen Sulphide Gas in Heart Diseases Therapy

Hydrogen sulphide which is best known for its rotten egg smell and nitric oxide could soon act as a treatment for heart problems, according to a new study. The Scientists at the Peninsula Medical School at the University of Exeter and the National University of Singapore have found out that the interaction between hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, which both occur physically in the body, could guide to innovative treatments for heart failure.

Both of the gases act together with one another naturally and the researchers found that the equilibrium between them and other chemical compounds influences people’s health. These two gases were found to interact together to form a thiol-sensitive compound (connected to the sulphur in H2S) which produces inotropic muscular contraction and lusitropic muscular relaxation effects in the heart. Inhaling of high levels of hydrogen sulfide can cause death within just a few breaths. There could be a loss of consciousness after one or new breaths. This high level of exposure would not be likely in a home, but can happen in a workplace.

This cross talk suggests that there is the possibility to manufacture a molecule that may be of benefit to the heart and which could be the source of a new drug therapy based on elements that occur naturally in the body. Our findings are potentially very thrilling and offer a narrative insight into understanding how and why the heart fails. This could lead to new treatment and management strategies of heart failure,” said Prof. Matt Whiteman, joint author from the Peninsula Medical School.
Hydrogen Sulphide Gas in Heart Diseases Therapy

The majority of countries have permissible limits in force that govern the utmost permissible levels of contact to hydrogen sulfide in the working atmosphere. A characteristic permissible exposure limit in many countries is 10 ppm. While the characteristic odor of H2S can be easily identified, its olfactory exhaustion effects mean that one cannot depend completely on the nose as a caution apparatus. The only trustworthy way to settle on exposure levels is to measure the amount in the air. Regular monitoring will help to identify areas and operations likely to exceed permissible exposure limits, and any areas that routinely pose overexposure hazards should be equipped with continuous monitoring systems.

Hydrogen sulfide can influence the body if it is inhaled or it comes in contact with the eyes, skin, nose or throat. It can also involve the body if it is engulfed. The Inhalation of small concentrations may cause annoyance, faintness and upset stomach. At greater concentrations hydrogen sulfide may cause loss of consciousness and death. Hydrogen sulfide has a strong odor of rotten eggs at low concentrations and a fairly sweet odor at higher position. As hydrogen sulfide is produced naturally in the body, the environment and the gut, enzymes survive in the body able of detoxifying it by oxidation to safe sulfate. Therefore, low levels of hydrogen sulfide may be bared for an indefinite period. The hydrogen sulphide gas and as such are called sour gas wells from their unpleasant stink.